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Economic Justice the ethics of doing business with the poor

This seminar focuses on doing business in the world's poorest communities. Businesses that engage with these markets find opportunities to make a profit while also doing good. The seminar discusses the economics of inclusive markets and the ethical considerations of engagement.



photo of kelly eskewKelly R Eskew; Business Law and Ethics; Kelley School of Business; Bloomington; kreskew@indiana.edu





photo of philip t powellPhilip T. Powell; Business Economics; Kelley School of Business; IUPUI; phpowell@indiana.edu






Upcoming Events:





Impact Investingphoto of a building on IU Bloomington's campus called Hodge Hall

John Duong

Lumina Foundations' Director of Lumina Impact Ventures

Holiday Hart McKiernan

Lumina Foundations' Executive Vice President & Chief Operating Officer



Monday October 16th 7 PM

IU Bloomington, Hodge Hall, Room 1046

Food Provided.



Co-sponsored by NetImpact, and the Trockman Microfinance Initiative student groups.






Otra Cosa No Hay (There is Nothing Else) Film Screening



photo from the film showing a valley and indigenious peoples homes

Monday October 23rd 6 PM

IU Bloomington, Hodge Hall, Room 1000

The water-rich highlands of the Colombian Páramo de Santurbán are nearly pristine, evidently preserved by the traditional mining communities inhabiting the region. The delicate balance maintained between economic needs, exploitable natural resources, and environmental protection has recently been disrupted by the arrival of foreign large-scale mining companies. Otra Cosa No Hay (There is Nothing Else) transports its audiences to this remote region of Colombia in order to provide complex insights into the conflicts between local people, foreign companies and environmentalists over the proper use of Colombia’s natural treasures.

Food provided.



Professor Christina Ochoa discussion following the film (7 PM)

Executive Producer and Director Ochoa will talk about Economic Activity and Human Well-Being's Impact on indigenous people following the film's screening.








PHILIP T. POWELL

Kelley School of Business; IUPUI



BUSINESS AND THE POOR: THE ETHICS AND THE ECONOMICS

Wednesday March 29th at 7pm

IU Bloomington Campus; Hodge Hall; Room 1050

Free lecture, pizza will be offered

The world's economic resources are overwhelming consolidated in business, or markets.  While governments and NGOs have a role to play in economic development and poverty alleviation, the power of business to radically transform the lives of the world's income-poor communities is exponentially greater.  The six-part seminar will start on February 8, 2017, with a discussion of the macroeconomics of inclusive markets.  This session will engage participants - faculty, community members, and students - in an interactive discussion that tells the dynamic story of how doing business in inclusive markets - with the "bottom of the pyramid" - creates shared value.







PROFESSOR ADRIAN SAVILLE

GordonInsitute of Business Science; University of Pretoria



photo of adrian saville

INVESTMENT, SOCIAL IMPACT, AND BUSINESS IN SUB-SAHARA AFRICA

Monday March 6th at 7pm

IU Bloomington Campus; Hodge Hall; Room 1050

Free lecture; pizza will be offered

Over the past 15 years, many of the economies that make up sub-Saharan Africa have recorded extraordinary progress.  By way of example, the Rwandan economy has grown without interruption for more than 20 years in a row; and Angola ranked as the fastest growing economy in world over the decade to 2014.  In 2012, this led the world largest weekly printed news magazine, TIME, to describe Africa as the “world’s next economic powerhouse”.  As we head into 2017, Africa remains rich in potential and constitutes the second-fastest growing region in the world after Asia.  Yet it also is the case that Africa is complex, diverse, poorly understood and that the region remains challenged by yawning deficits inter alia in education, healthcare and infrastructure that point to the pervasive need to continue transforming socially, politically and economically.  Against this backdrop, in this lecture we will discuss the challenges and potential of the region, examine nuances that afford a better understanding of different economies and also explore investment prospects.  Arguably, the most exciting of these opportunities relate to inclusive innovation in transforming economies, such as Kenya, Nigeria, South Africa and Zambia, that are found across multiple industries, such as finance, education, entertainment and healthcare.

Learn more about Professor Saville here.






PROFESSOR TASHMIA ISMAIL

Gordon Institute of Business Science; University of Pretoria



photo of tashmia ismail

NEW MARKETS, NEW MINDSETS: WEALTH CREATION IN POOR COMMUNITIES

Wednesday March 8th at 7pm

IU Bloomington Campus; Hodge Hall; Room 1050

Free lecture; pizza will be offered



In South Africa, around 60 percent of the population is unserved or underserved by current business and many other providers of support and services. That's a significant new market, and doing business in this market can achieve a great deal more than simply finding new customer. Regardless of global trends or govnermental pressues, accessing these markets is challenging. Often customers who survive on minimal incomes seek and will value different market offering from those traditional customers have purchased. The have unique needs and identities requiring innovative, nontraditional models and approaches.


Professor Ismail will discuss pioneering business and their base of the pyramid champions, as well as theri experiement, successes, failures and best practices in creating new and sustainable markets in previously underserved communities.

Learn more about Professor Ismail here.